Picking the right colorspace based on image content

An often overlooked aspect of color-spaces is the ability to use them to affect the overall “look” of the image. This 3D model represents 4 color spaces:

Pro RGB (in red), Adobe1998 (translucent white), sRGB (white wire-frame) and in yellow; a professional giclee printer – the Epson 9900 on Ultra Smooth Fine Art Paper.

GamutSaturationLimits

Top view of these gamuts shows their maximum saturation limits. The yellow wire-frame in the center is the available gamut of Epson’s 9900 Inkjet Printer.

The top view shows the saturation boundaries of the colorspaces. The larger the space appears here, the more saturation the color space will support.

 

 

Gamut brightness limits of ProPhotoRGB, Adobe1998, sRGB and the Epson 9900

Gamut brightness limits of ProPhotoRGB, Adobe1998, sRGB and the Epson 9900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The side view shows the brightness levels available in the various color spaces. White is represented at the top and black at the bottom.

 

 

Color-spaces with larger hulls allow for greater saturation limits. This means a red with an RGB build of 255, 120, 120 will appear more saturated in ProPhotoRGB than it does in Adobe 1998.  Neutral colors will appear identical for hue across the color spaces, though the density (brightness) of those neutrals may differ.

How this affects the look of the image is quite dramatic. A side effect of saturation limits is it’s affect on the visual difference between two neighboring color values.  The examples below are screen grabs of the same color build across the three most popular working color-spaces. The left side of the boxes are a build of 255R 255G 126B, and the right sides are 255R 255G 112B

The color variation is barely perceptible in sRGB, but noticeable in the slightly larger Adobe1998 and more so in the much larger ProPhotoRGB. You can also see that as the size of the colorspace increased, the saturation increased.

Images with subtle variations in tone may be adversely affected from the use of a larger colorspace such as ProPhotoRGB, however if an increased separation is what you are looking for, tagging your file as ProPhotoRGB may benefit.

These samples, like the ones above contained all identical Photoshop builds, but were assigned different spaces. As the size of the color space increased you can see that the color separation also increases resulting in a loss of subtlety.  This loss means in increase of color noise, and in 8 bit files: a potential for banding. Real 16 bit files (not files converted from 8bit to 16) have a small likelihood of banding as long as they remain in 16bit. However, large portion of professional printing devices will eventually convert your 16bit file to 8bit for printing, and this could result in banding issues. Regardless of bit-depth, saturation will be higher in the larger spaces, so it’s something to be aware of and use to your advantage when needed.

This image is in the sRGB color-space. Notice the presence of subtle tones

The variations in tones in this image are pleasant yet still fairly subtle.

The variations in tones in this Adobe1998 image are pleasant yet still fairly subtle.

The subtleties in the lilly pad are nearly lost. A visible increase in color noise is also present in the water.

The subtleties in the lilly pad are nearly lost. A visible increase in color noise is also present in the water.

You will notice in the examples that as file is moved into spaces of increasing size, subtleties in the colors can be lost.  You can see larger views by clicking on the sample images.

As saturation increases, the the visible difference between neighboring colors increases. One artifact of this is an increase in color noise. This becomes quite apparent when comparing the reflections between the sRGB and the ProPhotoRGB files.   Also worth noting is how the “sky” colors in the reflection actually lose saturation with the larger ProPhotoRGB space. This is due to Adobe1998 and sRGB having greater saturation in a significant range of values in this region of color. So if sky saturation is of critical importance in your print, do a bit of testing before you commit to ProPhotoRGB and compensate when possible. Sometimes we get to accept some benefits at the expense of others, and working color-spaces are no exception.

sRGBLillyPadsToPrintSpace

sRGB color-space file converted to the Epson 9900 print space using perceptual intent.

Adobe1998RGBLillyPadsToPrintSpace

Adobe 1998 RGB color-space file converted to the Epson 9900 print space using perceptual intent.

ProPhotoRGBLillyPadsToPrintSpace

ProPhotoRGB color-space file converted to the Epson 9900 print space using perceptual intent.

So use your colorspace selection as a tool to further optimize your print results. Be conscious that you aren’t losing or gaining numbers of colors by using a different space, you are merely matching image type to saturation limits and distance between colors. And as always, should you have any questions, reach out in the comment section below!

GRAYS, Curated by Sarah LaVigne and Printed by Reed Art & Imaging

SarahLaVigneViews

Sarah LaVigne inspects mounted prints in the Reed finishing department

 The Curator

Sarah LaVigne curates ‘Grays’, a gathering of images that explores the world through the eyes of photographers, Annie Marie Musselman, Michael Lewis, Acacia Johnson and Mandy Barker. Reed had the honor of printing and mounting these images for Sarah’s exhibition at SPACE Gallery. The show is sponsored by Picture Society and runs February 12 through March 21. It’s just one of many exciting events scheduled for Month of Photography Denver.

 

Reed finishing tech cleans a print mounting board

Keeping the print clean and dust free is priority one at Reed Art & Imaging

Grays_Production

Reed printer, Dan Walters collects a print off the spooler

 


The Artists 

 

 

 

"Penalty" By Mandy Barker

“Penalty”

Mandy Barker
Mandy Barker_Barnacle-Ball

Mandy with a barnacle encrusted soccer ball

“769 marine debris footballs, plus 223 other types of balls were collected from 41 different countries and islands around the World. They were recovered from 144 different beaches by 89 members of the public after an online appeal over 4 months.”

 ~ Mandy Barker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

"Caedus & Ladyhawk"

“Caedus & Ladyhawk”

Annie Marie Musselman

Annie Marie Mussleman

“I photograph through very small holes, in an incredibly strong fence which protects me, but barely keeps me from falling in love with these highly intelligent, beautiful beings.”

~ Annie Marie Musselman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Michael Lewis in Boat

Untitled

Michael Lewis

Michael Lewis

 

“Self-portraiture allows me to experience empathy for the people I photograph.  I feel an obligation to my subjects to remain in touch with how it feels to be in front of the camera.

The images shown here originally started off as a series of still-lifes photographed in domestic settings, showing situations which address the repercussions and catastrophes of a common life.  Slowly the ideas drifted into the outside world.  The themes are less literal and more fantastical.  The work evolved and eventually split into two separate bodies of work.  Loosely entitled “Tales,” this new project drifts away from images anchored by reality.   They are constructed open-ended narratives which rely on symbolism and metaphor; as well as mystery.  With intension, often nothing is revealed.”

~ Michael Lewis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

acacia_ws_3_ 026

“Prism Explosion”

Acacia Johnson

acacia_polaris1_CC

“These have been, without question, the radiant highlights of my time in Arctic Bay. I absolutely love it. I try to photograph it, and often I have to resort to digital, because what else are you going to shoot in the dark on the back of a moving Skidoo or dogsled at thirty degrees below zero? At first I perceived this as a failure of some sort, on my behalf. Now I can see it is actually a miracle. That the ISOs of digital allow us to capture images that never could have existed. The best camera is the one you have with you. There will be photographs.”

~ Acacia Johnson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Today We Bid a Fond Farewell to our E6 Developing.

goodbyeE6Today we at Reed say goodbye to our old friend E6. When the E6 slide film process was introduced, the ground-breaking technology brought amazing real-life color and contrast to an already booming sector of photographers. Decades later the advent of digital capture technology, through its instant gratification, led to a rapid decline in the interest in slide film.

Just a few years back, the demise of the Kodachrome process was a clear indicator of things to come. The momentum behind the growth of digital capture was strong and the with lure of shooting quantities of images with no cost to develop them, the decline of film as a medium was inevitable.

With all the opportunities that digital brings to the table, it has its drawbacks and expenses too. Software, storage, migration of files as storage technology changes, obsolescence of file formats, and the list goes on. Transparency has the benefits of easy storage, it’s inherently archival and easy to view. No file format changes, no technology changes, no expensive software and no paying an assistant for hours of post capture digital time. This of course meant the photographer had to get it right the first time with no tools like photoshop to save the day. It was an era of bring your skills to the set and the camera or go home.

Digital has certainly changed the way we creatives do business, and it has increased competition as excellence in image quality has become more approachable with the addition of advanced editing tools. We now have more creative minds in our industry than ever before, and they’re stretching beyond the previous limits of the medium to bring amazing images to our world.

Progress means leaving the old behind and moving into the new. There are always trade-offs with change. The smartphone instantly connects us like never before, but we spend more time on social media and less time pursuing our dreams. The automobile brings great mobility at increased speed over the horse drawn carriage. But with it also comes environmental issues. We truly are a culture of instant gratification and film just doesn’t fit that model.

We’ve been watching a renewed interest in film photography blossom as today’s generation of students begin to embrace the old-school processes. But for E6 processing at Reed, it’s just too little and too late.

We intend to keep running our dip and dunk professional C-41 color neg film and B&W film lines as long as there is enough interest in those artistic mediums. At one time, we had one of the very best E6 lines in the nation. We were proud that Kodak and chosen us to be the very first regional participant in their acclaimed Q-Lab system – requiring tolerances twice as tight as professional standards. Tolerances which we easily met and exceeded. Unfortunately, our E6 volumes have been just too low to keep the 72 gallon developer tanks in-check and the product quality was suffering.

We would rather turn it off than deliver a product to you that doesn’t meet our standards. It’s been a good run, and a big part of the foundation on which we originally built our business and our national reputation.

As we flip the power switch for the very last time today, we say “Farewell old friend”.

Old-School Meets New School: The Portragon 100 f:4

PortragonObliFrontAs part of an ongoing lo-fi experiment I have been acquiring a number of old-school lenses that are known for being less than perfect, and I’ve modified good lenses, all in the quest to find just the right level of ethereal beauty. Lomography’s recent release of their Petzval reminded me of another lens released decades ago; the Spiratone Portragon 100mm f:4. This sole purpose of this lens was to re-create the effect of the very early single meniscus lenses used on bellows-focus cameras of the time. I had never owned a Portragon, so I had no personal reference regarding it’s Image Quality (IQ). That said, I was off to google where I found… well, very little in the way of examples. One YouTube video and a handful of photos – none of which gave me any real sense of the strengths this lens might posses.

The now defunct Spiratone company was largely a reseller of inexpensive knock-off type accessories. They would buy in bulk, rebadge the items and sell them for as cheaply as they could afford to. While a good amount of their products were a disaster waiting to happen under professional use,  a portion of their product line was quite usable in their day. The less complicated an item was, the less likely it would fail, so items such as extension tubes were pretty safe. Very little of their items would be considered heavy-duty or pro-grade, and granted the pro was not their audience. Their full-page ads in the back of Popular Photography and Modern Photography were aimed straight at the budget minded amateur. I knew that if Spiratone sold it, chances are it was sold in the hundreds of thousands of units so I should easily find a few on ebay. And that I did! Fourteen dollars plus shipping, and two weeks later it was sitting on my doorstep.

The lens sports a T-Mount thread and arrived with a Canon FD adapter installed. Two minutes later it was dressed with an adapter for Nikon-F.
I was pleasantly surprised at just how well made the Portragon is. The body is all aluminum with buttery-smooth helical focusing from 3.2ft to Infinity with approx 170° throw. That’s a lot of fine-tune accuracy for a lens that has very little inherent sharpness.

This lens is amazingly small. Here is it compared to an 80’s era Nikkor 50mm:

Nikkor50mmOnBody

Nikkor 50mm

Spiratone 100mm f:4 Portragon

Spiratone 100mm f:4 Portragon

 

The Portragon 100 is very susceptible to flare, but the shooter can use that to their advantage.

The Portragon 100 is very susceptible to flare, but the shooter can use that to their advantage.

The ethereal properties of this lens look best to me under diffused light.

The ethereal properties of this lens look best to me under  bright diffused light.

Taking the lens for a test-drive had its challenges; primarily that the IQ in the viewfinder was nothing like the rendered file. Oddly, the viewfinder showed an image of much tighter focus than was yielded in the file.  Being fixed at f:4, there is no stop-down aperture to blame for the discrepancy. It’s just one lens on the end of a threaded barrel – that’s it.  Nikon’s focus assist helped me to find focus as did live-view at full zoom. The sweet spot for the Portragon lens is a small zone that’s dead – center of the image circle. Bokeh is a tiny bit smeary at the edges and it’s as soft as a baby’s back-side throughout. And forget about apo-correction – there is none. But that’s part of the Portragon’s lo-fi charm!

 

 

If you shoot strictly jpegs, or if you use them for proofing, you might find a custom shooting mode helpful with this lens. I tend to shoot hybrid (jpeg and raw together), for the post capture flexibility.

This lens shoots flat - really flat.

This lens shoots flat – really flat.

A tweak to contrast brings the image around easily. A custom shooting mode could also be used compensate for the lens' lack of contrast.

A tweak to contrast in LightRoom brought the image around easily. A custom shooting mode could also be used compensate for the Portragon’s lack of contrast when shooting jpegs.

For the cinematographer, this lens just might be a secret weapon for certain sequences. The lens is soft, yet sharp and the color-smearing, well you really need to see it for yourself. Lo-fi and other artsy shots like lens-whacking are presently gaining popularity on commercial TV for edgy transitions and B-roll, so having a readily available tool in your kit just might make that producer a bit friendlier. The lens is so small, it fits in a vest pocket with ease.

 

All of the images and the video have been shot using a Nikon with APS size sensor. A larger sensor would certainly yield a slightly sharper looking result. If I get the opportunity to test that one day, I’ll be sure to add some samples to this post.

The portragon 100mm F4 is pure bokeh

The lens is corner to corner bokeh – even in the “in-focus” areas.

It’s certainly not a lens for every occasion and for that matter, it’s usefulness may be quite narrow in scope; but for an “art” lens, I am quite pleased with the results of the Portragon 100mm f:4. and its amazing potential make it a very powerful tool in the photographer’s kit.

The Portragon 100mm can be had on ebay for under $50, though you can find a better deal if you’re willing to be patient — as I mentioned, I got mine for $14 plus shipping. Some sellers are asking near $100 or more.  KEH occasionally has them in the $40 – $50 range. I’ve seen this lens badged under both the Spiratone and the Kama brand-names — Same lens, just different resellers.

If you’ve shot with this lens and would like to share some of your images with us, post a link to your flickr album in the comments below.

Here’s a few more of mine: 

 

Happy Shooting!

 

Possible Construction Avoidance Routes

It’s actually pretty easy!

coneThat magnificent highway that normally makes it easy to get to us, is going through a much-needed expansion. While we get that in the end it will
make things easier for the commuters who use that highway long-term, it’s making some areas of traffic slower short-term.

We know your time is valuable so we’re providing some possible alternate routes that should keep you clear of the construction related slow-downs.

Click the map for a full view!

BLUE LINES =  Routes that we suggest

DOTTED BLUE LINES = These routes are usually very good, but occasionally have delays

RED LINES = These routes are NOT suggested as they experience frequent delays or closures.

 

Construction Zone

Click for a larger view

Coming from the west we suggest

  • Colfax or
  • 6th Ave.

Coming from the East we suggest

  • Colfax or
  • 8th Ave.

From the South, we suggest you avoid Federal Blvd and come in via

  • I-25 or
  • Knox Ct to the 6th Ave service road, which turns into 8th Ave as shown on the map.

From the north

  • Federal Blvd or
  • I-25

 Google Map

Click for a Google Map of our location

 

Contact Us

As always, you can call us with any questions at 303-573-8084

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Seeing Things – March 2014 Issue 1

 

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The Creative Process

By Greg Osborne


Probably the biggest, or at least most common pothole in any creatives road, is the blank page, canvas, screen, etc., that we face every time we sit down to begin a new project. To be creatively blocked can be the scariest thing for someone who makes their living by, essentially, creating something out of nothing. More intrinsically, artists tend to ground their self image in their vocation. To be “not creative'” is akin to “not being”.


I’ve been extremely fortunate to have had the benefit of good, sometimes great art instructors who taught me “how to be creative”.


With the delivery of a slightly less sarcastic version of David Letterman, one of my art school instructors gave us this speech (well worn, I’m sure) on the first day of my first class in design school:


“All of you are creative (I hope). At some point, you came to the conclusion that there must be a reason for thinking and doing the weird things that you have thought and done over the course of your short, weird lives. It occurred to you, or someone close to you, that it might be a good idea to use this weirdness to your advantage. That’s why you’re sitting here today. Your main frustration, up to this point, is that your weirdness can be erratic, you don’t know how to turn on the creative light bulb that hovers over your weird little heads whenever you feel like it. This will be essential if you are to have any success in this field. That’s why I am standing here today. I’m going to teach you how to turn that light bulb on whenever you feel like it! [yanks on imaginary cord] I will show you how to spin your weirdness into gold. Not boatloads of gold, but enough gold to buy more than the Ramen noodles that you are currently surviving on.”


Condescending, yes; but, it was undeniably true and came as welcome assurance to the group of misfits who had recently landed in the Spring Quarter, Visual Communications Program at the Colorado Institute of Art (condescending sarcasm, by the way, can be a great motivator!).


What I began to learn there has served me well over the two decades that I’ve been able to call myself a working artist. Perhaps my biggest lesson into the mystery of “turning the lightbulb on’ was learning the Art of The Brainstorm. Or more accurately, The Art of The Solo Brainstorm.
Unfortunately, we don’t always have the luxury of an organized group of creative types to meet with and play-off each other whenever we need to drum up a great idea. Most of the time, especially if you’re a freelancer or contract worker, you’re pretty much on your own.


There are many schools of thought on this subject. Some business guru-types advocate nine steps to the “perfect” brainstorm; others, as few as four. However it is broken down, these steps can be applied to virtually any creative endeavor. As I am a graphic designer by trade, I will relay my methodology in that regard, but the basic principles will carry over to most any creative area.



Set Your Stage

Get “your stuff” together. All of those things that you need to function creatively; pens, pencils, markers, X-Men action figures. If you’re brainstorming at your computer, and these days, we usually are, disconnect from the usual electronic activities and distractions; email IM, etc. Music is a personal choice. I happen to prefer lyric free, Brian Eno-type ambient music to set my stage.

Destroy Preconceptions

If you’re still using terms like “Thinking outside the box”; you’re probably still somewhere inside the box. Throw “the box” and the metaphor in the imaginary trash can. Even if it’s just in your own mind, stay away from Creative-Speak, Corporate-Speak and the rest of the Cliche-Speaks. Terms like “synergy”, “harmony” and “maximizing (fill in the blank)” are just exercises in semantics. You’re not in a conference room, you’re a creative community of one. I know, I’m probably abusing my own rule somewhere in this article, but you get the idea.


ALSO: Look at stuff outside of your immediate interest area. For instance, when one of the most creative rock musicians and songwriters in history, Jimmy Page, sat down to write, he funneled blues, country, Eastern and international folk music into some of the most groundbreaking rock music in history.


And then…


Feed Your Muse

Surround yourself with creative stimulation. This is something that, in my case, has been acquired over time. In the pre-computer age, it was common to collect “tear sheets” or samples of other peoples work whom you admired, from magazines, books, brochures or other printed materials. This is NOT plagiarism, it is simply collecting and assembling your own version of the design annuals that companies like Graphis and AIGA put out every year.


Of course this can be adjusted to whatever your field happens to be; illustration, photography, writing, etc. Now-a-days, I keep a digital “Grab File” or folder with images that, for whatever reason, captivate me.


RULE OF THUMB: If you find yourself staring at an image for more than a few seconds — even if you hate it — GRAB IT! It may not be obviously apparent, but there is something successful about the image that is holding your attention; something that could provide a spark for the creation of something you DO like in the future. (And just because you don’t think that it’s “good” doesn’t necessarily mean that it isn’t.)


Deconstruction

All creative works, good, bad or otherwise, can be a valuable solo-brainstorming exercise in themselves. Google a competitor’s product and de-construct it to find out why it succeeds — or not — at capturing your attention or communicating the idea.


Crank Out The Good The Bad and The Ugly Ideas

Do not edit yourself! This is a rock solid principle of the group brainstorm. Whether you use a white board, “mind map” method, or you’re just “sketching out” ideas in Photoshop; keep turning out possibilities — half baked and otherwise. This is the time for quantity; not quality. Ideas are like lily pads; most of the time they exist just to get to the next — hopefully — brilliant lily pad. Spend as much time as you need to get it down, make quick notes or adjustments if necessary, and move on.


Like Albert Einstein said: “Nothing happens until something moves.”


Step Back

At this point in your solo brainstorm, it’s a good move to step away from the project. When the ideas stop flowing, it’s time to take a break. Or, if you have the luxury of walking away for awhile, completely remove yourself from the project. Very often, I will jump between projects when I feel that I’m getting stale. Clear your creative palette and re-visit it later.


Discovery

Now is the time to cull your ideas. At this point, the good stuff will be apparent and the seemingly crappy or borderline stuff is ready to reveal any fruit that might be ripe for the picking. You’ll know where to cut your losses with the dead end stuff. With fresh eyes and a fresh outlook, the obvious solution(s) quite often jump right out at you.


These tried and true tips and techniques have helped me through some scary-dry creative spells. You can tailor them to fit your particular craft, profession or needs, of course. And hopefully, they’ll help to put you on a relatively smooth, creative road — without the potholes.
And please, feel free to share your thoughts, ideas, comments. We can only make this process better with your help!

2014 Denver Month of Printmaking is Here!
By Reed Art & Imaging
Month of Printmaking Denver (Mo’Print) is a celebration of the art of making original prints to inspire, educate and promote awareness through a variety of public events and exhibitions in Denver and the metropolitan region. For a full schedule of programs and events, go to: http://moprint.org/
The Epic Austin Music History Chronicles
Photography & Words Of Scott Newton
By Reed Art & Imaging

 
 
 
 
Photographer Scott Newton has been an avid observer chronicling the evolution of music, politics, and his own personal life in Austin, Texas, since 1970– from The Armadillo in the early 70s through 35 years of Austin City Limits.
 
If you love the Texas music scene of the 1970s & ’80s, well then friends, this is right up your alley. Scott’s photography is among my favorite ever of this era and of the characters that he brilliantly and intimately captured with his lens… And his personal commentary is icing on the cake. Enjoy.
 
 
Colorado Photography Festival™
By Reed Art & Imaging
The 4th Annual Colorado Photography Festival will be held from June 7-14, 2014. Ten of the nation’s premier photographers will give instruction in the classroom and in the field on numerous aspects of professional photography, from capturing your images to optimizing them in Lightroom. This year’s instructors are Glenn Randall, Dan Ballard, Russ Burden, Andy Cook, Jay Goodrich, Jan Kabili, Mike Berenson, Joseph Roybal, Gene Tewksbury, and Grant Collier.

You Can Now Embed Getty Images’ Gorgeous Photos On Your Blog for Free
By Reed Art & Imaging
    This is shaking up the stock imagery business a little bit. Getty Images is now letting you embed their images for free; with a few, not unreasonable conditions. For more info, go to: http://gizmodo.com
2014 International Call for Entries

By Reed Art & Imaging
This year, CPAC and Center Santa Fe are partnering on the exhibition component of Center’s Project Launch award.


Project Launch is presented to an outstanding photographer working in fine art series or documentary project. The grant includes a cash award to help complete or disseminate the works as well as providing a platform for exposure and professional development opportunities.


This grant is awarded to complete or nearly completed projects that would benefit from the award package. It requires signature of a contract to participate in an exhibition at the Center for Contemporary Arts, during Review Santa Fe and then will travel to CPAC for a second exhibit in 2014.


Learn more at Center
By Reed Art & Imaging

Gallery showings and events can be key to sales for the artists as the go-to event for art buyers. Openings and the ensuing sales are the life-blood of successful galleries. We’ve put together a few resources for the artists and the galleries that rep them.

 

More Call for Entries:

These lists are national and current. If you have a favorite list you want to share, let us know and we’ll pass it along next month.
 
https://www.entrythingy.com/forartists_calls

http://galleryphotographica.com/     2014 San Francisco International Photography Exhibition

http://www.adobeawards.com/us/   Adobe Design Achievement Awards

http://www.ephotozine.com/article/rps-international-competition-157-call-for-entries-23957   RPS International Competition 157 Call For Entries

A few places to get exposure for your gallery:

These may not be the usual place you list an art show, but the usual places might not be the first place the potential buyer looks. Adding these to your existing list can widen your marketing reach and increase buzz.
 
Zvents.com  The feedback we have heard directly is that zvents.com has helped get events listed first page on Google and increase event attendance. 
 
Yelp.com  Yes it’s a review site, but their mobile app offers up a “Things to do in the area” list. Perfect for drawing in folks who are already out on the town and in your neighborhood. Ask your artists and your attendees to leave a review. 
 

Foursquare.com  Another mobile friendly way to bring locals right to your door. Encourage your artists and show attendees to check in to foursquare and leave a review. The more reviews, the better the exposure and the higher the traffic potential. The potential from crowd-sourced marketing is huge. 
 
Have some great ideas? Drop us a line and we’ll add them next month. 
OVER 150 PHOTO CONTESTS:
Show Off Your Skills & Earn Cool Stuff!
Thanks to Wendi over at wsphotodesign.com for sharing this one with us:

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Reed E-News February 2014

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What’s All This Talk About TrueArt?
By Reed Art & Imaging
 
For newer members of the Reed family and for those who have been with us for awhile and are just curious
 
 
 

The TrueArt ™ Experience is Reed Art & Imaging’s proven creative and commercial methodology that ensures an amazing outcome for everyone who walks through our doors. This method is designed to guide you through all phases of the business and creative process by assessing and matching your needs to our comprehensive line of products and services. Reed devised this unique approach to not just simply meet your needs, but exceed your expectations.




Okay, that’s the "elevator speech”, but how do we actually accomplish this?

 





TALENT


To start with, every person at Reed Art & Imaging is passionate about quality, creativity and precision; and everyone here is creative in their own way. Many of us are working artists. That’s why you will hear us say at times; "artists working for artists". The business of "imaging" has moved at a lightening pace over the years; good shops have come and gone. In a bittersweet way, Reed has been the beneficiary of this upheaval by acquiring some of the best artistic, photographic and printing talent in the region.




LISTEN & COLLABORATE


Reproducing fine art, photography, rare family photos, or any visual display is always a collaborative process. With that said, a successful collaboration always starts with getting to know one another. It’s talked about so often that it’s almost a cliche, but we truly do LISTEN to you. In addition to what is actually being spoken, real listening often means understanding what is left unsaid or unexplained. That’s what we ‘listen’ for most of all. With this in mind, we are able to feel out those questions or desires that customers sometimes have trouble verbalizing when they’re unfamiliar with a product or service, or maybe just looking for another direction to go in.




We don’t fill your head with sales pitches and product babble, You talk; we listen; then you talk and we listen some more. When you’ve ‘talked yourself out’, then we advise. Understand, we want you to stay, but If the best solution for you means recommending one of our competitors; then that’s what we will do.




We assume nothing more than your expectation of quality and desire for a satisfying customer experience.  






RESULTS


As ‘creatives’, it is easier to put ourselves in your shoes when you walk through our doors for the first time. Whether you’re a professional artist, photographer, serious intermediate, or someone coming in for a simple, one-off gift for a friend or loved one; we will help you to maximize your budget for the absolute best results.




KNOWLEDGE


We are also not just a storefront business, we are a hive of creative activity that loves to share our knowledge with our guests. If you are more comfortable with seeing the process over being told the process, then a tour of the facilities will gladly be offered. We will be happy to teach you as much as you want to know.




FOLLOW-UP


Oftentimes a client’s frustration comes from ‘Not Knowing’. This can be anything from not having a clear picture of a technique or procedure, unanswered questions, not knowing how to ask the right question, or simply not being kept in the loop during the job process. The TrueArt™ process builds this accountability into the job flow. Again, it gets back to listening and anticipating the needs of our guests.




And when it’s all done; we do it again.  It’s easy to do a great job once. The real trick is doing it over and over again. In the end analysis, Quality with Consistency, is what Reed Art & Imaging strives for. We are…




"At Your Service".

 
 
 

Farm Fresh Celebrates 30th Anniversary with Cover Art Contest


Cash prize provided by Colorado Creative Industries

DENVER – Weds., Feb. 6, 201
Colorado Creative Industries and the Colorado Department of Agriculture today announced a cover art contest in honor of the 30th anniversary of the Colorado Farm Fresh Directory, a listing of farms, farmers’ markets, CSAs, u-picks and roadside stands that offer fresh produce and other farm products direct to the consumer. Amateur and professional artists are encouraged to submit original artwork for the contest. The winning entry will be featured on the cover of the 2014 Colorado Farm Fresh Directory and the artist will receive $500 courtesy of Colorado Creative Industries.

 
Entries must relate to Colorado agriculture in some way. Artwork may be created in any medium, but must be submitted as digital files. The Farm Fresh Directory is the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s most popular publication, and 110,000 copies of Farm Fresh will be distributed statewide the last week of May. 

"Year after year people look forward to this popular publication," said Wendy White, marketing specialist at the Colorado Department of Agriculture. "We hope the cover art contest gets people even more excited about this year’s Farm Fresh."




The 2014 Farm Fresh Directory will be available on the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s website, www.coloradoagriculture.com. The deadline for entries is March 14, 2014. For more contest information, contact Loretta Lopez at 303-239-4115 or visit www.coloradoagriculture.com.



About Colorado Creative Industries:


Colorado’s Creative Industries Division, Colorado’s state arts agency, is a division of the Office of Economic Development and International Trade. Established to capitalize on the immense potential for our creative sector to enhance economic growth in Colorado, the mission of Colorado Creative Industries is to promote, support and expand the creative industries to drive Colorado’s economy, grow jobs and enhance our quality of life. For more information, please visit www.coloradocreativeindustries.org. 

 
 
The Photographery of Lynsey Adderio
By Reed Art & Imaging
 
I’m not sure if I can come up with a great definition of art, but as the old saying goes "I know it when see it". The photojournalism of Lynsey Addario will run you through the gamut of human emotion. Her subjects are often heartbreaking as they are breathtaking. They’re never boring as they illuminate the Human Condition like few others can.
 
 
 
 
See and Be Seen
By Reed Art & Imaging

Gallery showings and events can be key to sales for the artists as the go-to event for art buyers. Openings and the ensuing sales are the life-blood of successful galleries. We’ve put together a few resources for the artists and the galleries that rep them.

 

Call for Entries:

These lists are national and current. If you have a favorite list you want to share, let us know and we’ll pass it along next month.
 
https://www.entrythingy.com/forartists_calls


http://galleryphotographica.com/     2014 San Francisco International Photography Exhibition


http://www.adobeawards.com/us/   Adobe Design Achievement Awards


http://www.ephotozine.com/article/rps-international-competition-157-call-for-entries-23957   RPS International Competition 157 Call For Entries

A few places to get exposure for your gallery:

These may not be the usual place you list an art show, but the usual places might not be the first place the potential buyer looks. Adding these to your existing list can widen your marketing reach and increase buzz.
 
Zvents.com  The feedback we have heard directly is that zvents.com has helped get events listed first page on Google and increase event attendance. 
 
Yelp.com  Yes it’s a review site, but their mobile app offers up a "Things to do in the area" list. Perfect for drawing in folks who are already out on the town and in your neighborhood. Ask your artists and your attendees to leave a review. 
 

Foursquare.com  Another mobile friendly way to bring locals right to your door. Encourage your artists and show attendees to check in to foursquare and leave a review. The more reviews, the better the exposure and the higher the traffic potential. The potential from crowd-sourced marketing is huge. 
 
Have some great ideas? Drop us a line and we’ll add them next month. 
 
 
 
OVER 150 PHOTO CONTESTS: Show Off Your Skills & Earn Cool Stuff!
Thanks to Wendi over at wsphotodesign.com for sharing this one with us:
 
 
 
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Reed Art & Imaging 888 Federal Blvd Denver, Colorado 80204 United States (800) 999-8084

Reed E-News January 2014

 

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Recipients of our 2013 Referral Rewards Announced!
By Reed Art & Imaging
We are so blessed to have such loyal friends and fans who share their excitement about us with their network. In a sign of appreciation we are rewarding our top referrers with some pretty cool gifts.
Congratulations to our recipients and a huge thank you to everyone who continues to refer us to their family, friends and business associates!

1st Highest – Most New Customers = Framed Image (Choice of iPad Mini or Microsoft Surface)

2nd Highest – Most New Customers = Karen Rubin ($200 in services)

1st Highest – Total Business Volume From Referrals = Reed Masten ( (Choice of iPad Mini or Microsoft Surface)

2nd Highest – Total Business Volume From Referrals = Andy Marquez ($200 in services)

1st Place – Random Drawing = Alissa Williams ($500 in services)

2nd Place – Random Drawing = Four Reel Productions ($200 in services)

“I’m still shocked about the referral prize. I can’t wait to receive my iPad mini. Thank you so much!!! Not only for the prize, but for the decades of great service Reed has provided me with.”

“I’ve been doing business with Reed Photo since 1982 when I worked for Jefferson County and still used film. Since then I started my own business and transitioned to digital. Reed Photo has always been there for me with great service and expert work. I love their Gallery Mount product and they always get my recommendation when someone comes to me looking for digital restoration, expert printing or canvas transfers. I know they will do a spectacular job!”

Thanks for over 30 years of excellence!

Warm regards,

Reed Masten

Fuji Turns Up the Heat on Retro Design
By Reed Art & Imaging

Image from Verge.comRight on the heels of the successful release of the retro styled Nikon Df, the buzz is gaining momentum for this new entry into the retro styled market. The new camera from Fujifilm rumored to be titled the X-T1 is said to feature a 16megapixel APS-C sensor, interchangeable lenses, wi-fi and more manual controls than you can shake your cable release at. The estimated official announcement date is set for January 28, 2014, with a first sale date projected to be in February, 2014. Sources point to a body-only price of $1,700 US.

Grab more details via Photo Rumors Here

Prepping Your Art for Gallery Presentation
Via cpacphoto.org

cpacphoto.orgFrom exhibition submission to gallery wall, the presentation of your work is vital to how it is perceived. How do you make the best possible print? What kind of mounting and framing is most appropriate? What is archival? What do you ask for in a photo finishing lab? How do you approach a gallery? How do you prepare for portfolio reviews?

Join CPAC Director Rupert Jenkins, Reed Art & Imaging General Manager Gary Reed, and photographer Jessie Paige, at this special Gallery Standards seminar. Using examples from our current juried exhibition, One by One, and the instructors’ own collections, this seminar will cover preservation and conservation standards, options for display, mounting and matting, and best practices for approaching a gallery. If you value and care for your own and others’ photography, this seminar is for you.

Gary Reed graduated from the Art Institute of Colorado in photography, and since 1991 has been the General Manager of Reed Art & Imaging. From 2004 – 2010 he co-managed the Reed Photo-Art Gallery in Denver’s Art District on Santa Fe and in 2005 became an art district board member. He is currently the Treasurer/VP and has been an integral part of their growth and success. Still an avid photographer, he occasionally exhibits and sells his work in various local galleries and art fairs.

Read more and get details at cpacphoto.org by clicking here.

See and Be Seen
By Reed Art & Imaging

Gallery showings and events can be key to sales for the artists as the go-to event for art buyers. Openings and the ensuing sales are the life-blood of successful galleries. We’ve put together a few resources for the artists and the galleries that rep them.

 

Call for Entries:

These lists are national and current. If you have a favorite list you want to share, let us know and we’ll pass it along next month.

A few places to get exposure for your gallery:

These may not be the usual place you list an art show, but the usual places might not be the first place the potential buyer looks. Adding these to your existing list can widen your marketing reach and increase buzz.
 
Zvents.com. The feedback we have heard directly is that zvents.com has helped get events listed first page on Google and increase event attendance. 
 
Yelp.com.  Yes it’s a review site, but their mobile app offers up a “Things to do in the area” list. Perfect for drawing in folks who are already out on the town and in your neighborhood. Ask your artists and your attendees to leave a review. 
 
Foursquare.com.  Another mobile friendly way to bring locals right to your door. Encourage your artists and show attendees to check in to foursquare and leave a review. The more reviews, the better the exposure and the higher the traffic potential. The potential from crowd-sourced marketing is huge. 
 
Have some great ideas? Drop us a line and we’ll add them next month. 

Reed Customer Service & Products

trueart@reedphoto.com * PH: 303-573-8084 * TF: 800-999-8084 * FAX: 303-573-8087

www.reedphoto.com


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Reed E-News October 2013

www.ReedPhoto.com
 

Dear Artist,

FTAF 10 

We Want To Thank You!

In years past, many of our loyal friends and associates have been kind enough to send quite a bit of new business our way during the holidays. So this year we want to say thank you. We’ll be rewarding that good behavior with some pretty cool gifts.

Here is how we are saying thanks...

Artist Interviews

An Interview with Mark Sink

Photographer/curator /artist and probable wearer of many other hats, Mark Sink has been as integral to the Denver art community as a certain quarterback has been to the Denver sports scene. An artist who, despite his many successes, has remained as easily approachable and true to his art as he was as a kid studying painting and printmaking at Metro State College in the seventies. Sink is a strong proponent of the ‘less is more’ school of photography; capturing stunningly beautiful images with low-tech tools like the Diana toy camera and the age-old Wet Plate Collodian process. As he made a point of telling us: “My career is very non-photo serious, I’ve used toy cameras much of my career. I’m a ‘reverse technology-o-phile’— going the other direction, you know? The Big Picture comes from that.”

Amongst his many achievements, Sink is responsible for Denver’s Month of Photography (MoP), one of many “Month of Photography” events around the world that bring together an eclectic mix of local artists, galleries and creatives for a month long celebration of the art of photography.

Reed Art & Imaging sat down with Mark in the kitchen of his home in the old Highlands neighborhood of Denver to talk primarily about MoP, but it was hard to limit the conversation to just one facet of a thirty five-plus year artistic journey. The life of Mark Sink has been anything but uneventful…

Read More:

Has This New Sony Changed the Photo Landscape for the Better?

Smartphone photography has been lacking some important features – that is, until now. With Sony’s release of their QX Series “Lens Style Cameras” the camera-phone concept reaches new turf.

The two features I miss most when shooting with my Samsung Galaxy or my iPad are depth of field control and real optical zoom. Both are now possible with this fantastic add-on.

This concept replaces the traditional camera’s body with your mobile device giving you the potential of a really massive view screen. Imagine a point and shoot with 10″ LCD and you get the idea. These lens-style cameras are compatible with any iOS or Android device that will run Sony’s app and can connect via wi-fi or NFC one-touch. Because the camera contains it’s own password protected wi-fi hotspot, no separate wi-fi network is required.

Read More:

Contests and Entries

Smithsonian Magazine Photo Contest 2013

Smithsonian Magazin Photo Contest 2013

Enter photographs in any of their five categories and compete to win cash prizes.

  • The American Experience
  • The Natural World
  • People
  • Travel
  • Altered Images

This year theyare also looking forward to highlighting the best photographs taken with mobile devices, so as you enter your work into the aforementioned categories, let them know that it was taken with your phone or tablet reader and show the wonders of this new generation of photography.

Read more: 

You can also follow them on Twitter: @SmithsonianMag

Yosemite Renaissance XXIX

Yosemite Renaissance Call for Entries

International Deadline: November 16, 2013 – Yosemite Renaissance is an annual competition/exhibition which is intended to encourage diverse artistic interpretations of Yosemite. Its goals are to bring together the works of serious contemporary artists that do not simply duplicate traditional representations; to establish a continuum with past generations of Yosemite artists; and to help re-establish visual art as a major interpretive medium of the landscape and a stimulus to the protection of the environment. Historically, the arts have played a very important role in the establishment of our State and National Parks. It is our hope that they can be just as important in future efforts to preserve and protect that heritage.

More Details and to Apply:

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How Colors are Created in the Digital World

This short basics post will prime you to understand how colors are specified in digital files. In the reproduction market, of which Reed Art & Imaging is a part of, we use digitally driven devices to make faithful reproductions of original art, photographic captures and digital graphic designs. To accomplish this task with any hopes of repeatable accuracy, there must exist a standard system by which colors can be recorded, transferred, translated and output. These standards exist in theoretical color models. These models are a virtual shape, such as a box, sphere. polygon or other shape that if it were real, would contain every color visible to the human eye.

By SharkD (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The RGB color model mapped to a cube. The horizontal x-axis as red values increasing to the left, y-axis as blue increasing to the lower right and the vertical z-axis as green increasing towards the top. The origin, black, is the vertex hidden from view.

Because the model is represented by a shape, they are referred to color “spaces”, for the space the object would occupy in the theoretical environment of all colors – visible and invisible. The graphic above is an example of a space that uses Red, Green, and Blue to yield the final color we want to create.

Colors come to our eyes in two ways – or transmitted from a light source or reflected off of a surface.

RGB is called the “primary” space and it’s numerical system can be equated to the brightness values of transmitted light – or how intense the Red light, Green light, and Blue light are shining. As the numeric value increases, the lights get brighter and the closer to white they become. More on that in a bit.

In a CMYK model (the secondary space) we are representing pigments that absorb light. So as the number increases in their scale, the more light is absorbed. So with CMYK, the higher the number, the darker the color appears – exactly opposite of RGB.

In either space, the ratio of how the colors are blended determines the color, while numeric values contribute to how bright or dark it is.

For simplicity, the rest of this article will use only one color model. I’ll use the RGB model for these examples because it’s the model that our clients use and best supports high-end reproduction digital printing.

How Color is Expressed

Color is usually expressed in human terms by it’s

  • Value (light to dark)
  • Saturation (how close to pure is it)
  • Hue (red, purple, green, yellow, orange, etc.)

In the data driven world, it’s expressed as a recipe of the colors required to build its final value, saturation and hue. Image and graphics applications usually use the standard scale of 0-255 ( what is called 8-bit color) to represent the amount of each color present, with 0 being none and 255 being maximum. Dark colors being closer to 0 and light colors being closer to 255. Equal amounts of each color create neutral hues ( grays ) and as the numbers increase from 0 to 255 the value moves from black to white.

Darker values are closer to zero and lighter values are closer to 255

Darker values are closer to zero and lighter values are closer to 255

 

These numbers from 0 to 255 are called “Levels” and in our examples fall into a model of 256 levels – with zero being included as a level.  In an RGB color space, each color is built using various levels, or recipes, of Red, Green and Blue.  Dark Red has a different recipe than Light Red, and the recipes are different for a saturated versus less saturated red.

Fully saturated red is a different build than a less saturated red.

Fully saturated red is a different build than a less saturated red.

Dark Red has a different build than Light Red.

Dark Red has a different build than Light Red.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see in the first example above, a fully saturated hue has 255 of it’s requisite colors and none of the other colors. As the color desaturates, it gains some of the other colors; it’s moving closer to a neutral gray.  In the second example we can see that the Darker Red contains none of the other colors, but the Red number is dropping closer to zero; thus making it “blacker.” This darker red is as saturated as it can get at this present value.

A critical point to understand is that in an RGB or CMYK file, color and density are inter-connected. Meaning that any change you make to color data will result in changes to density and visa-versa.

 

The other primary colors are built in the same way, like this:

Color builds of fully saturated Red, Green and Blue.

Color builds of fully saturated Red, Green and Blue.

 

The secondary colors are built from equal amounts of two of the three colors:

Graphical representation of the secondary color recipes

Secondary colors are built from two of the three colors

These secondary colors are thought to be the “opposite” colors to those in the previous example. You will notice their recipes are directly inverse. Red is R255 G0 B0 and Cyan is R0 G255 B255.  They are opposites because when the two colors are combined, they cancel each other out and make gray.  Equal parts of Red and Cyan make gray, same goes for Green with Magenta, and Blue with Yellow.

Intermediate colors such as Orange, Brown, Purple, Daisy Yellow, Lemon Yellow etc. are built by using various values of the three colors where at least one of the colors is greater than 0 and less than 255:

Intermediate color builds

Intermediate colors result from builds using two or more colors.

 

This 8-bit model, using it’s 256 level per color channel architecture allows for approx 16.7 million variants of color and density.  (256 x 256 x 256 = 16,777,216).

Other bit-depths exist that extend the number of available colors; the concepts are the same, but the numbers differ.

For example: 12-bit color – the depth that most digital cameras record in raw format, has 1,728 levels per color channel (instead of 256) with a total number of 5,159,780,352 available colors, much higher than present technology can reproduce in a print or display.  The commonly used 16-bit depth has 4,096 levels per color channel with a total number of 68,719,476,736 available colors – yes that’s 68.7 Billion!  While some professional pigment printers and their RIPs can support a 16-bit file, getting the subtleties from that many colors on paper and dots via a limiting 8 to 12 different ink colors is still problematic.

If you have questions, post them in the comments below.  If you want to see how this all ties together with Photoshop channels, stay tuned, that’s next!