Westword Article by Patricia Calhoun

Patricia Calhoun of Westword penned a great article about our upcoming move to the 40 West Arts District:

http://www.westword.com/arts/reed-photo-moving-to-west-colfax-as-lakewood-snags-another-arty-enterprise-9099173

Stay tuned by <a href=”http://www.reedphoto.com/receive-our-e-info-newsletter/”>subscribing to our newsletter</a> and following us on our social channels. [social_web_link][/social_web_link]

We Have Moved!

For the last four decades, Reed Art & Imaging has owned and occupied the building at 888 Federal Blvd., in Denver, Colorado. That is about to change for us.

Due to a roadway widening project, by the City and County of Denver, we will be losing our entire customer parking lot.

“Staying was simply not an option. Our customers often need to pick up large and extremely valuable prints. Without on-site parking , and little street

Soon to be our new location at 8000 West Colfax Ave., Lakewood Colorado.

parking available, there was no way we could accommodate them safely and conveniently,” said Owner Bob Reed, who in 1976 founded Reed in the basement of his Lakewood home with wife and business partner, Betty Reed. “Our goal now is to turn this challenge into an opportunity that will better serve our customers and increase our contribution to the local art communities.”

With this in mind, we are excited to introduce our soon-to-be location in the heart of the fast-growing 40 West Arts District in Lakewood, Colorado. Given their own Lakewood beginnings and love for the arts, Bob, Betty and the rest of the Reed family feels like the move is a coming home of sorts.

Board Chairman and Executive Director of the Lakewood West Colfax Business Improvement District, Bill Marino feels likewise: “We are thrilled to have Reed join one of the state’s fastest growing arts districts and help us continue our mission of revitalizing West Colfax.”

Added one of Reed’s managers, John Harris: “We are eager to start a new chapter in a city that fully supports the creative arts, and in an art district that is rapidly growing its ranks. The historic building was once the Lakewood Movie Theater and we’re excited to bring visual creativity back to this building.”

40 West is one of the fastest growing art districts, and we will be proud to call it home.

At over 20,000-square feet, our new home will have room for a gallery area that will allow us to display work from our amazing family of clients, like renowned fine artists Kathy Beekman, Carrie Fell, Karmel Timmons, and photographers such as David Muench, John Fielder, and Jeff Mitchum. There are just too many to mention.

We also plan to use the parking lot along the front of historic Colfax Avenue for pop-up galleries or art markets, where artists can set up booths to sell their work. The new building will also be an ideal space for hosting fundraising events for arts and culture-focused non-profits.

To best serve our clients, we plan to stay open at the 888 Federal location throughout the transition to our new home, less than five miles

We are working closely with the City of Lakewood to preserve the historic signage on the building.

and just a few minutes away. Minor renovations are being made to the new site and we’re currently working with the City of Lakewood to keep the building’s important historic signage intact.

Through the many chapters of Reed’s history, we’ve seen a great deal of change, but we have always been a team of artists and creatives who have striven to bring success to our client’s endeavors. As ‘Artists Working for Artists’, that will never change.

As we near our move, we will announce our grand opening event. Stay tuned!

Family-owned and operated Reed Art & Imaging is a nationally recognized fine art printmaker based in Lakewood, Colorado. Established in 1976 to create elite-level photographic and fine art prints, the company is dedicated to helping professional artists grow successful careers by providing the finest quality editions and reproductions. To better realize this goal, Reed has developed the “TrueArt Process,” a methodology focused on maximizing the creative equity that artists of all skill levels invest in their work. Reed also provides mounting and lamination services, large format pigment, metal and photographic prints, graphic design services and final installation.

Reed Art & Imaging Announces Move to Lakewood’s 40 West Arts District

NEWS RELEASE
June 13, 2017
For more information contact:
Lu Stasko, The Stasko Agency
303/477-9902 (Office)
720/404-4507 (Mobile)

For Immediate Release

Reed Art & Imaging Announces Move to Lakewood’s 40 West Arts District

— Long-running printmaker has acquired a new home on West Colfax Avenue —

DENVER, CO – Reed Art & Imaging, one of Denver’s oldest fine art printmakers, has purchased a new home in Lakewood’s 40 West Arts District. The company will move later this summer into an historic former movie theater at 8000 West Colfax, which currently houses a Harley-Davidson dealership. The move will provide Reed with more space and the ability to better showcase the work of their extensive client base.

Reed has operated out of its current location at 888 Federal Blvd. since 1979, but changes caused by the City of Denver’s Federal Boulevard Improvement Project, prompted the move. The project, which will add a third northbound lane between 5th Avenue and 14th Avenue on Federal and widen both the northbound and southbound lanes in that corridor, will eliminate Reed’s front parking lot, leaving it with insufficient parking for its customers and more than 30 employees.

“Staying was simply not an option. Our customers often need to pick up extremely valuable large format prints, so without on-site parking and with little street parking available, there was no way we could accommodate them safely and conveniently,” said Reed Owner Bob Reed, who founded the company in 1976 with his wife and business partner, Betty Reed. “Our goal now is to turn this challenge into an opportunity to better serve our customers and increase Reed’s contributions to the local art communities.”

At over 20,000-square feet, Reed’s new home has room for a gallery to display client artwork, some of which include such renowned artists and photographers as Karmel Timmons, John Fielder and Jeff Mitchum. Reed also plans to use its new parking lot along Colfax Avenue for pop-up galleries or art markets, where artists can set up booths to sell their work. Using the new building to host fundraising events for arts and cultural-focused non-profits is also a possibility.

“We are thrilled to have Reed join one of the state’s fastest growing arts district and help us continue our mission of revitalizing West Colfax,” said Bill Marino, Board Chairman and Executive Director of the Lakewood West Colfax Business Improvement District.

Reed plans to stay open throughout the transition to its new home, which is less than five miles from its current location. The company will be making minor renovations to the new site and is currently working with the City of Lakewood to keep the building’s historic signage intact.

“Many of Reed’s employees are artists and are passionate about pursuing their craft, so moving to an area that is focused on advancing artists and creative entrepreneurs feels like coming home,” added Bob Reed.

Family-owned and operated Reed Art & Imaging is a nationally recognized fine art printmaker based in Lakewood, Colorado. Established in 1976 to create elite-level photographic and fine art prints, the company is dedicated to helping professional artists grow successful careers by providing the finest quality art editions and reproductions. To better realize this goal, Reed has developed the “TrueArt Process,” a methodology focused on maximizing the creative equity that artists of all skill levels invest in their work. Reed also provides mounting and lamination services, large format pigment, metal and photographic prints, graphic design services and installation.

For more information visit www.reedphoto.com/moving

###

Reed Celebrates 40 Years

anniv40th-fbbanner

We’ve seen great change in the decades since we opened our doors.

Some creative mediums have shifted away from slower technologies into faster methods that allow artists to move faster into distribution of their editions.  Forty years ago, the internet was used exclusively by educational and government institutions and the idea and personal computing was limited to geeks and hobbyists.   Every print we made was exposed in total darkness and editions required very long hours (and sometimes days) of repetitive burning and dodging.

Modern technology has simplified some aspects of printing but some things haven’t changed at Reed.

Today, because your hard-earned reputation hangs in the balance,  every print is still hand-inspected for quality assurance and carefully hand-packaged prior to shipping to you or your buyers.  We continue to package as eco-friendly as we can because the planet we share deserves our respect. You wont’ find excess inks, plastics, or manufacturing in our packaging – just for the sake of making it prettier. We strive to eliminate excess material waste from the beginning of your job through delivery to your door. And we source from recycled and reclaimed materials when it’s appropriate.

Holding on to the old-ways is a good thing.

We think that old-school craftsmanship still has a place in the world of fine-art editions – that technology should be seen as a tool and not a primary focus in doing business.  While many vendors in our industry push further into electronic automation, we continue to keep the human element of craftsmanship in the areas where it matters most.  And like the old-days, you’ll find we welcome open conversations between you the artist and those who make your prints, because your artistic vision is more important to us than putting up barriers. Yes we actually see you as important – not as an inconvenience.  Some values are worth holding onto.

Thank you for everything you have done to help our continued success in this industry!

Sincerely,

  The staff and family at Reed Art & Imaging.

Art Lenses and the Photographic Print – are you wasting money?

Lightjet versus Lambda – are you wasting the money you spent on expensive art lenses?

Large format printing and why the LightJet is superior: It’s in the details – literally, The construction of the Lightjet is superior to the Lambda due to the ways that each device projects it’s laser light onto the photographic paper.

The LightJet loads it’s chromogenic print paper into a perfectly round, precision engineered drum with the laser beam that travels dead center along the axis of the drum’s circle.  This means the laser always strikes perfectly LightJetLamdaLaserCompareperpendicular to the paper, a perfectly round laser dot across the entire image area. The result is maximum sharpness and detail across the entire print – corner to corner, edge to edge.

Unfortunately the Lamda uses a stationary laser that swings in an arc as the paper moves along a track. This causes the laser to be “bologna cut” as it moves away from the center of the print towards the edges – creating longer and longer oval pattern. So the only perfectly sharp area of this print is precisely down the middle. As the laser moves towards the edges, the print increasingly suffers detail and sharpness loss. While this design allows for extremely long prints over ten feet, the loss of quality is substantial and noticeable.  Such print lengths provide productivity benefits to the company making the print, but not to the fine artist customer looking for the finest print available.

“For photographers who have invested in expensive art lenses to get edge to edge sharpness and enhanced IQ, it’s clear that the flat-transport technology is taking away the benefits you paid a bundle to get.” ~ John Harris: 30 year industry veteran.

We are a nationally recognized leader in fine-art grade large format archival printing for the professional Creative. We price competitively whether you need one print or a full edition, and our TrueArt™ Process guarantees your satisfaction.

Learn more about our chromogenic print options. 

Are you on trend with metal prints?

You’ve heard about them, you’ve seen a few, but you’re still wondering what it’s all about.

Metal prints are exploding on the art scene and consumers are loving it!  Images printed on aluminum are modern, stylish and impactful and add a higher perceived value than flat prints.

So what’s the deal with metal prints?

I want to help you understand the differences in your choices.

The home version of metal prints

The craft version of metal prints is done with an ink jet printer.  Ink is printed on either a transfer paper or on an aluminum sheet.  (Not to be confused with metallic ink jet papers.)  The paper sheets are adhered to aluminum (or other materials) with heat.  The aluminum sheets are specially prepared to receive the ink.  The aluminum sheets are fragile being only from .005” up to .025” thick and should be mounted to another material to create a rigid piece.  This method compatible with most ink jet printers and while inexpensive is prone to fading.  This is a great option for craft projects.  There are strict size limitations based on the printer’s abilities and limited purchase options.

Dye Sublimation or Infused Metal Prints

This technology starts when a high-resolution full-color mirror image is printed on specialized transfer paper – sometimes called a carrier sheet.  This carrier is then is carefully aligned and heat infused with a specially coated aluminum sheet.  Through heat and pressure the inks are vaporized and drawn into the coating on the metal. When the transfer process is completed, the metal print is allowed to cool and the dyes are now locked into the coating.

The coating is applied in different surface textures and a choice of opaque white, or clear that allows the metal to show through. Currently Reed provides you with four choices of finished surfaces: white matte and white gloss as well as clear matte, and clear gloss. The white metal print options are the most popular as they look like most like a normal photograph.  Clear allows the metal to show through in the highlights for a distinct and eye catching effect.

The metal print coatings are quite durable, resistant to moisture and abrasion, making them an excellent choice for humid or high traffic areas. They are also more fade-resistant than ink jet prints and can be easily cleaned with non-ammonia glass cleaner. They can be used outside but should be kept out of direct sun light.

Dye sublimation by many accounts is considered an improvement over traditional ink-jet printing as it has higher saturation and contrast with a much richer black, and no visible dots.

This is a great print for the artist looking for quality, speed and affordability. Approximately 1/16”;  we have sizes available up to 48”x96”.

Finally, the metal product with the highest sharpness is called a Contemporary Metal Print.

This is a photographic print created by exposing latent image photo-sensitive polyester media to laser light, and then developing in a photo chemical bath. The print is archivally mounted to a rigid 1/8” thick aluminum plate using cold press adhesive and an amazing and eye grabbing glossy laminate that improves contrast, apparent sharpness and color that looks very high-end.

Because the media is polyester and not paper it is not prone to peeling like large paper prints can. Being a photographic process using lasers, there are no visible dots in the final print.

With the high level or sharpness and amazing visual depth, the contemporary is the ideal option for artists and their buyers with discriminating tastes.  Rigid 1/8″ thick aluminum available in dimensions up to 48″x96″

If you have further questions the group of talented artists at Reed will be glad to assist you.  We know how to collaborate with you and see your visions become reality.

The Difference Between Pigment Prints and LightJet Digital C-Prints

Q: What is the difference between lightjet digital c-print and Giclee? Which is better quality? Thanks! ~ A. A.

LightJet uses laser light to expose chromogenic photographic paper, which is then chemically developed and fully cleansed to create the archival dyes that render the fine-art image.

Giclee printing uses electrical impulses to deposit archival pigments onto fine art substrates such as canvas or watercolor papers, similar in the way a home ink-jet sprays inks.

As for your question about which has better quality: Though you will find fans on both sides of the fence, neither is really lesser to the other for “quality” but they each have their differences that can be appreciated. Fine art photographers tend to prefer the LightJet Digital C-Print because the photographic print has a certain look and feel that works very well with the art-form and the color tends to be less artificially saturated and thus feels natural. Giclee Pigment Prints are often favored by fine artists due to the substrate selections of watercolor paper or canvas being closer to that of their original artwork. They both posses extremely high sharpness and wonderful color, contrast and detail. The Lightjet is continuous-tone and does not use dots, allowing for smoother tones and detail in highlights with richer saturation in the shadows. The Giclee Pigments allow for more mid-tone color saturation, especially in the yellows and magentas.

Lightjet and Giclee Pigment are both for reproduction of fine art, and exceed the quality of consumer level printing by significant margins. When combined with professional archival fine art substrates and the skills of a master printer the result is a genuine fine art print. Both prints are museum quality and as such, certificates of authenticity may be used with integrity.

Our LightJet and Giclee Pigment prints have been hung in fine art museums and the Smithsonian, so rest assured you are getting the “real deal’ in a fine art grade print regardless of your choice.

Staff Wheat-pasting for Month Of Photography 2015.

 

Every two years the highly energetic creatives here at Reed turn things up to 11 when Month Of Photography(MOP) comes around. This bi-annual event has gone global in its reach and this year was no exception. MOP 2015 has seen large-scale gallery participation in support of photography as an art form, and the outdoor attraction of wheat-pasting is exploding in popularity. We’ll have a several posts covering activities around this event, but this bit of fun is one of our own.  This is the second time that we have made the exterior of our building available for wheat-pasting artists during MOP. An art form traditionally using black and white images on inexpensive paper, this year our team decided to go bold with a splash of color. We had a great time hanging the work of our in-house artists with a special section reserved for winners of our social media competition. This show’s curation and direction was handled by our own Barb Pullin and Gary Reed.

The reviews for this show have been mixed. Traditionalists don’t care for the color – some quite adamantly against it, while those willing to step outside of tradition are looking to embrace it in their works for the next MOP.   Have a look and let us know your thoughts. Should wheat-pasting be black and white only, or do you appreciate the color?

Update: We’ve had five pieces stolen from this show – peeled right off the walls!

 

Behind the Scenes – Outdoor Installation for Month of Photography

It’s a busy street corner, and the building is vacant, but an eyesore it’s not. Now dressed in the fine art of Liz Hickok, the building is now sporting jewel like colors and makes a bold statement – all in honor of a show at Michael Warren Contemporary Gallery in Denver’s Santa Fe Art District.  Part of the bi-annual Month of Photography, this is just one of dozens creating a buzz. Liz Hickok’s amazing art joins pieces from all over the globe. Kick back and relax as Gary Reed and Jody Akers install this magnificent artwork.

Reed Art & Imaging, Richo, and John Fielder Sponsor Picture Me Here Event

PMH_MOP_Flyer_

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Event: “Damak to Denver: A Picture Me Here Project” Exhibit Features Bhutanese Refugee’s Photographs and Stories of their last days in a refugee camp, their journey to the United States and their first days in Colorado. Location: John Fielder’s Colorado & the Denver Photo Art Gallery, 833 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, CO 80204
Exhibit dates: March 6 – April 25, 2015 Opening reception: March 6, First Friday, 5-9pm Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Saturday from 9am-5pm, with extended hours on First Fridays Project Partners: United Nations Refugee Agency, International Organization for Migration, Caritas Nepal, Reed Art and Imaging, Ricoh/Pentax, Colorado Photographic Arts Center, Aurora Cultural Arts District, City Museum of Kathmandu, 258 Kickstarter Donors
Denver, CO (November 22, 2014) – Last Spring, Picture Me Here (PMH), a digital storytelling program for refugees based in Denver, provided cameras and training to Bhutanese youth living in a refugee camp in Eastern Nepal. The young refugees were scheduled to resettle in Aurora and most arrived by August. This training led by photographers and storytelling mentors empowered them to document their last days in the camp, their journey to Colorado and their first impressions of life in the US. Opening on March 6th, John Fielder’s Colorado & the Denver Photo Art Gallery will host an exhibit featuring a selection of these photographs by these individuals as they reflect on the past and start building new lives in America. Photographs and books will be available for purchase. Proceeds support the photographers, the PMH program and John Fielder’s Colorado & the Denver Photo Art Gallery.
PMH started in 2012 working with local refugees. The project in Nepal is their first international project and was made possible with help from the United Nations Refugee Agency. “PMH is committed to fostering communication, integration and connection among diverse groups of people. Participants document their lives and realize the value of their stories while learning new skills in leadership, technology and English” says Brigid McAuliffe, PMH director. Exhibit is open to the public and is free admission. More details about the exhibit can be found, when available, on www.denverphotoart.com
________
# # #
“Everything about the photo says Nepal, from the posters on the wall to the men. It reminds me of how much I love Nepal.” – Keshavi Neupane
“Dhaka weaving is very important and a big part of life in Nepal. The women are like a second mother to me and hold a very special place in my heart.”  – Keshavi Neupane
“This is a photograph of my neighbor. She is sieving rice to make food. Though she’s extremely old, she has the power to see the very small pebbles. This is something she does twice a day, both early in the morning and again in the evening. By seeing this photograph, I realize that every person is capable to do work.” -Bhim Bahadur Bhattarai
“This woman is my aunt. She is cooking curry with some tomatoes in the bowl beside her. The sunlight scatters from the slats in the wall of her refugee hut.” -Bhim Bahadur Bhattarai
“This is the photograph that I took Bhadrapur Airport in Nepal. At this time, I am ready to take a flight from Bhadrapur to Kathmandu, which is the capital city of Nepal. At this moment, I am feeling amazing because this is the first time I am taking the airplane. I am excited.” -Bhim Bahadur Bhattarai
“The woman has to go to the husband’s parents house, when we resettle. I came with my husband to Colorado because that is our culture. My heart was broken to leave my parents. After the camp closes they will go some place far away called Pan Cha Me, in the mountains.  They have a brother they have to take care of in the camp. My step dad does not want to come to America. There was one women who knew my mom and my stepdad. She knew they had lost their partner and told them to marry. They met and fell in love. My step dad likes to hold things in his hands when he takes pictures.“ – Aita Rani Subba
“Mohan is taking water home from the well. The water is for doing laundry. In the camp, Mohan and I did laundry together, 5-6 times a day.  A big family will carry 7-8 times because they have a lot of clothes.” -Aita Rani Subba
“In the camp, we had to follow a schedule to get water in the morning and evening. This woman is getting water for cooking and drinking. We stand in line to get water. Sometimes we wait one hour. America is very different from Nepal. This country is very fast. Very easy.  When I arrived at the Los Angeles airport I went to restroom. I put my hands under the faucet and the water came. How is it? I felt like someone was giving from above! I was surprised! The air dryer also surprised me. At that time a stranger taught me to dry my hands. I used the hand dryer and it was loud. I was afraid.” – Mohan Rai
“We came to America to make life. For our kid’s life. There are lots of Nepali people in Grace Apartments and the park is nice.”   – Mohan Rai
“We put a ceremonial scarf called a khada over the shoulders of the relatives and friends who are departing as a sign of respect and remembrance.” – Mani Kumar
“I used a camera a lot in the refugee camp to capture the last moments of our relatives before they departed for their destination.” – Mani Kumar
Picture Me Here participants and instructors in the classroom
Picture Me Here students and instructors on the last day of class.
Some of the participants at a recent exhibit featuring their photographs and stories.
Portraits of the participants at their huts (taken by the instructors)
Participants learned how to use a camera and they selected images for an exhibit in the refugee camp.