Tag Archives: printing tips

Beautify Your Photographs While Making a Great First Impression

We were recently introduced to a new type of laminate for photographs, ink jet and poster prints we call “Crystal” for its faceted like surface. This is very different than a normal gloss or lustre coating. Being 5 ML thick with full UV protection, this laminate is extremely durable. We put it to the test […]

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How to Get Great Color, Save Profits, and Never Have to Work Color or Density in Photoshop or Lightroom. Part 1

I’m going to fill you in on the secrets of how to get great color, save your profits, and never have to work color or density in Photoshop. All without the use of ICC profiles, confusing work-flows or batch conversions. If you understood the above and it applies to you, chances are you are a […]

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How to get Great Color, Save Your Profits, and Never Have to Work Color or Density in Photoshop. Part 2

My last blog post discussed the weakness of TTL metering and the need for spot on exposure to avoid working your files in photoshop. Thus saving money and time which should result in a more profitable business. Rule #2 – If you don’t have proper white balance, you don’t have correct color. This seems like […]

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How to Get Great Color, Save Your Profits, and Never Have to Work Color or Density in Photoshop. Part 3

My last two blog posts discussed the critical need for spot-on metering and absolute correct white balance to avoid working your files in photoshop. Thus saving money and time which should result in better prints and a more profitable business. Rule #3 – correct working space + Printer space = Great Print! Digital cameras work […]

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How to Get Great Color, Save Your Profits, and Never Have to Work Color or Density in Photoshop. Part 4

In the previous post in this series, I wrote about using sRGB for printing your studio work. This post we talk about how JPEG can be your workflow friend. Rule #4 – JPEG has benefits. Shooting raw has its place. Like when the dynamic range of the scene far exceeds that of your camera. Or […]

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Getting the Best Possible Print from Your Fine Art Lab. Part 5 of 5

Getting to Know You! Get to know the people who print your work. A true fine-art class facility doesn’t just work for you, they work WITH you to get the print that satisfies your vision. Only you as the artist know exactly what you want in your print. Good communication skills can bridge a tremendous […]

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Getting the Best Possible Print from Your Fine Art Lab. Part 4 of 5

Getting to the final print: How much trust should you put in color profiles? A few notes on profiles. First, they are not a magic wand. Don’t expect them to make a so-so image look fantastic. They are NOT a repair tool, they are a color matching tool intended to get the output to mimic […]

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Getting the Best Possible Print from Your Fine Art Lab. Part 3 of 5

File optimizing and sweetening. If done properly, this is an area in your work flow that can really make your image sing. Gross corrections in color and density should have been handled using Bibble as your raw converter. Fine tuning localized areas of the image such as burning and dodging can be handled in Photoshop […]

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Getting the Best Possible Print from Your Fine Art Lab. Part 1 of 5

The end result of a great print is always the sum of it’s parts. Every step along the way, from the click of the shutter through file preparation, all the way to print presentation choices, affect the visual appeal of the print. This author/artist believes that a fine art print does not lie strictly in […]

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Tiff versus jpeg. Does Size Really Matter?

Is Bigger Always Better? Often we are asked to describe the difference between tiff and jpeg files. While they share a few similarities, there are a few differences and particularly some characteristics in the Jpeg format that an individual looking to get the very best image quality should be aware of. A Tiff file (Tagged […]

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